Oral Healthcare
Morning routine

Healthy ways
to kick-start your day

If like most people you value your sleep, then mornings may not be your favorite time of day. But these healthy tips can make even the biggest night owl feel energized and refreshed throughout the day. Bring on daybreak - it’s going to be a beautiful day.

the most important meal of the day

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy.

 

When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy. When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy. When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy. When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy. When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy. When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy. When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

You snooze, you lose

 

The snooze button may seem like the greatest invention ever for a few more minutes of much needed shut-eye. But the truth is --  it’s doing you more harm than good.

 

That’s because your body has its own way of waking up. The process begins about two hours before you’re actually ready to wake up, and it starts with your core temperature increasing, which makes you feel less sleepy. When you’re woken up by an alarm, this process gets interrupted. While this is bad enough as it is, the moment you hit snooze, you trick your body into thinking it can go back to its dormant state. So when the alarm then goes off a second time (or let’s be honest, a third, fourth or fifth time), your body and brain are completely lost by your indecisiveness.

 

The result is that uncomfortable groggy feeling, which can last for up to two hours into your day. So tomorrow, instead of snoozing the morning away, set your alarm for the time you actually have to get out of bed. And then get up when it goes off.

 

Do this consistently every day and you should naturally begin to feel sleepy in the evening, because your body knows it will have to wake up X hours later. And what’s more, eventually you may be able to ditch the alarm, and rely on your natural body clock to wake you up.

Thaichi

Making morning workouts work out for you

 

Mornings are perfect for working out. For the reason alone that you can’t plead a lame excuse like having to work late or having a social event you can’t get out of. But more importantly, working out in the morning trumps any other time of the day when it comes to effectiveness.

 

Although your body is programmed to peak in the afternoon, studies have shown that by conditioning yourself to hit the gym, park or court in the morning, you can ultimately get more out of your workout in the morning than in the afternoon. It’s also proven that you burn more fat if you exercise before breakfast.

 

Last but not least, there’s the feeling of accomplishment you get before your day has even properly begun, making morning workouts really worth getting out of bed for.

Strawberries

Brush before breakfast

Okay, so after you get out of bed without snoozing, and after you go to the gym without having breakfast, brush your teeth. And only then fuel up for the day.

Logic may dictate you should brush after breakfast, but by brushing directly after your meal you can actually damage your teeth. That’s because many breakfast foods such as orange juice and yoghurt contain acids that weaken your enamel. So if you want to avoid scratching your temporarily softened teeth, either wait 45 minutes or simply brush before breakfast and then just rinse after you eat.

The most important meal of the day

You’ve heard it a thousand times before, but we’re going to say it yet again: have breakfast.

It really is that important. And here’s why:

 

Having something to eat in the morning gets your metabolism ready to burn calories before you’ve even set foot out the door.

 

Studies have shown that for this reason, having breakfast can help you lose weight. Research has also pointed out that having breakfast is associated with a sharper memory and a lower chance of heart disease.

 

And since most people aren’t at their most cheerful when they’re hungry anyway, do your body (and everyone around you) a favor and don’t skip that most important of meal of the day.

 

Work these changes into your morning routine and you’ll be off to a fresh and healthy start of your day, every day.

Random fact

We spend an average of 38.5 days brushing our teeth in our lifetime.
Brush before breakfast

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