Technology use among our aging population

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through a collaborative partnership and joint research, Philips and the Global Social Enterprise Initiative (GSEI) at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business have found that our aging population places a high value on technology as they age. However, the overwhelming majority believe today's technology needs to be better developed to help them successfully age at home, or age in place, for as long as possible.

 

In fact, while most want to age in their own home, they believe they will have significant barriers to achieving this through the aid of technology, such as access and adoption, cost, privacy, complexity of use, product integration, and public policy. These barriers, which need to be addressed for future generations, already have a deep impact on how seniors currently use technology today.

53% of boomers and Gen X believed it would be a good thing if their parents used technology more

 

Source: Aging Well: Technology Use Among Our Aging Population

Study reveals most Gen Xers and boomers want to age at home but 95% fear today’s technology is not up to the task.

 

 

 

 

Read the press release

The results of the Philips/GSEI study and the individual barriers to technology were discussed in an expert roundtable at Georgetown University in October 2013. Meeting participants included thought leaders with expertise in aging, health care, technology, and policy.

 

Download the report

Is tech the key to aging well?

Philips and the Global Social Enterprise Initiative at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business asked baby boomers and Gen Xers about technologies ability to improve their well-being and quality of life as they age.

 

Download the full infographic

About the Aging Well initiative

Through a collaborative partnership and joint research, Philips and the Global Social Enterprise Initiative (GSEI) at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business conducted a multi-year, three-part study on aging. Experts and industry leaders came together to examine the results and explore solutions to help people age at home, or age in place, for as long as possible.

2013 Roundtable attendees

Evan Barba, Assistant Professor in Communication, Culture and Technology, Georgetown

Debra Berlyn, Executive Director, The Project to Get Older Adults onLine

Alice B. Borrelli, Director of Global Healthcare Policy, Intel Corporation

Terry Bradwell, Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, AARP

Richard D. Brennan, Jr., Executive Director, Home Care Technology Association of America

Jon Broyles, Head of the Coalition to Transform Advanced Care

Susan V. Coleman, Clinical Faculty Member, Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies

Shawn DuBravac, Chief Economist and Director of Research, Consumer Electronics Association

Mark Emery, Innovation Program Director for Home Monitoring, Philips

Rod Falcon, Program Director, Health Horizons

Patricia Ford-Roegner, Senior Policy Advisor, Amplify Public Affairs

Elizabeth L. Grossman, Technology Policy Strategist, Microsoft

Kevin Haley, Senior Vice President of Innovation, Under Armour

Alicia Heazlitt, Director of Strategy, InnovateLTC

Drew Holzapfel, Managing Director, High Lantern Group

Sean Hughes, Chief Design Officer Healthcare, Philips

Koen Joosse, Director of Professional and Public Affairs, Philips

Tony Lee, Senior Manager, Federal Government Relations, Philips

David Lindeman, Director, Center for Aging and Technology at the University of California Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society

Robert Love, Editor-in-chief, AARP

Ladan Manteghi, Executive Director, Global Social Enterprise Initiative at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business

Dr. Leonard Marcus, Co-Director, National Preparedness Leadership Initiative

Louis McKinney, Senior Vice President and Regional Manager for the DC West region, PNC

Larry Minnix, President and CEO, LeadingAge

Brett Norman, Health Care Reporter, POLITICO Pro

William Novelli, Distinguished Professor of the Practice and Founder of Global Social Enterprise Initiative at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business

Laurie Orlov, Founder, Aging in Place Technology Watch

Song Pak, General Counsel, Revolution Growth

Lygeia Ricciardi, Director, Office of Consumer eHealth at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC)

Mary Rubino, Veteran Health Policy Editor, Health Affairs

Greg Sebasky, Chairman, Philips North America

Salim Shah, Chief Scientist, Georgetown Medical Center

Mark Stephenson, Head of Brand, Digital and Communications, Philips North America

Jeffrey L. Sturchio, Senior Partner, Rabin Martin

Michael Sturmer, Senior Director for Consumer Health Engagement, Clinical Operations at CIGNA

Crystal Swann, Director of Health Programs and Assistant Executive Director for Children, Health and Human Services, U.S. Conference of Mayors

Sandra Timmermann, Ed.D., nationally recognized gerontologist

Jeanine Turner, Associate Professor in the Communication, Culture and Technology Program, Georgetown University

Diane Ty, Project Director, Global Social Enterprise Initiative at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business.

Barg Upender, Founder, mobomo

Marc Warshawsky, Senior Vice President, Digital Products Executive at Bank of America

Daniel Rutherford Wilson, Director of Policy and Program Development, National Caucus and Center on Black Aged

New AgingWell hub unites innovators

The AgingWell Hub (AWH) is a unique new research center for open innovation that will examine and share solutions for aging well. The initiative will identify new technologies, products, and services, as well as provide thought leadership in collaboration with older adults, caregivers, healthcare systems, caregivers, payers, policy makers, corporate innovators, entrepreneurs, and academia.

 

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