White House Conference on
Aging

Aging Well

 

In July, President Obama hosted the White House Conference on Aging – a once-every-ten-years meeting that brought together hundreds of aging experts to “look ahead,” as the Conference put it, “to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.” Our Senior Vice President and General Manager of Philips Home Monitoring attended the Conference, gleaning key insights to inform the path toward making aging well a reality.

 

 

Insight #1: Caregivers are passionate about their work but desperate for help.

 

Technology can be a game changer for caregivers, whether it’s cutting red tape, providing easy access to needed information, or connecting older adults with their doctor in new, efficient and effective ways. But, as Barbara Beskind, a 91-year-old designer with IDEO put it, we must “design with, not for” older adults and their caregivers to ensure the innovation is sensible, accessible and meaningful.

 

 

Insight #2: Aging well requires a societal mindset change: people are living longer and can contribute longer with a supportive and enabled society and community.

 

The Conference was filled with examples of older adults who are living well as active members of society, from setting world records at age 63 to becoming a member ofthe Peace Corps at age 68. The crucial thing is for businesses, communities and governments to support this engagement by creating more aging-friendly products, services and environments.

 

 

Insight #3: In the aging well ecosystem, it’s about a systemized care team, not just a single player.

 

The Conference reinforced what many of us working in the “gerontechnology” field know – the solution to healthy aging takes more than one caregiver or healthcare provider. It takes a holistic, seamless, individualized and coordinated patient care experience that stretches across the health continuum from the hospital to home, from the caregiver to the doctor’s office and points in between.

 

These insights reinforce many of the findings from Philips and the Global Social Enterprise Initiative (GSEI) at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business’s multi-year, three-part study on aging, which tackles complex issues related the various barriers to technology adoption and implementation in caregiving, homes and communities.

 

 

The aging well challenge is clearly great – by 2030, one of every four Americans will be over age 60, and 90 percent of those over age 65 will have one or more chronic conditions. In addition, 10 million veterans – a population that brings with it additional unique mental and physical health needs – are over age 65. These realities demand outof the box thinking and a collaborative approach to find solutions to aging well. We invite you to join us to push the boundaries and break down the barriers to innovation that will enable older adults live happily and healthily as they age.

 

Join the AgingWell Hub LinkedIn group where innovators are gathering to make aging well a reality.

 

Join today

 

 

AgingWell hub unites innovators

The AgingWell Hub is a phased collaboration that examines how technology solutions and the creators of those solutions, including academia, healthcare systems, caregivers, payers and entrepreneurs can together create positive change toward the new aging well.

 

Learn more

The AgingWell Hub is a phased collaboration that examines how technology solutions and the creators of those solutions, including academia, healthcare systems, caregivers, payers and entrepreneurs can together create positive change toward the new aging well.

 

Learn more

The AgingWell Hub is a phased collaboration that examines how technology solutions and the creators of those solutions, including academia, healthcare systems, caregivers, payers and entrepreneurs can together create positive change toward the new aging well.

 

Learn more

AgingWell Hub

About the Aging Well initiative

 

Through a collaborative partnership and joint research, Philips and the Global Social Enterprise Initiative (GSEI) at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business conducted a multi-year, three-part study on aging. Experts and industry leaders came together to examine the results and explore solutions to help people age at home, or age in place, for as long as possible.

 

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